Skip to content Skip to main navigation Report an accessibility issue

Current + Past Exhibition Images


Violins of Hope

January 10 - February 20, 2019

The Violins of Hope are a collection of restored violins that were played by Jewish musicians during The Holocaust. These instruments have survived concentration camps, pogroms and many long journeys to tell remarkable stories of injustice, suffering, resilience and survival. The collection was assembled and restored by Israeli master violin maker and restorer, Amnon Weinstein.

In some cases, the ability to play the violin spared Jewish musicians from more grueling labors or even death. Nearly 50 years ago, Amnon heard such a story from a customer who brought in an instrument for restoration. The customer survived the Holocaust because his job was to play the violin while Nazi soldiers marched others to their deaths. When Amnon opened the violin’s case, he saw ashes. He thought of his own relatives who had perished and was overwhelmed. He could not bring himself to begin the project.

By 1996, Amnon was ready. He put out a call for violins from the Holocaust that he would restore in hopes that the instruments would sound again.

Amnon started locating violins that were played by Jews in the camps and ghettos, painstakingly piecing them back together so they could be brought to life again on the concert stage. Although most of the musicians who originally played the instruments were silenced by the Holocaust, their voices and spirits live on through the violins that Amnon has lovingly restored. He calls these 50 instruments the Violins of Hope.

Images of Human Rights Portfolio

February 1 - 23, 2019

The South African Bill of Rights was born out of a long struggle against racial segregation and human rights violations. Until the first democratic election in 1994, the majority of South Africans had been excluded from participating in the political process. Talks in the early 1990s between political prisoner Nelson Mandela and then South African leader F.W. DeKlerk ultimately led to free elections and a new government which aimed to respect the rights of all its citizens.

Images of Human Rights features 29 fine art prints, created by artists representing the nine provinces of South Africa and hand printed by master printmaker Jan Jordaan. The print portfolio was conceived of and released in 1996 by the Images of Human Rights Portfolio Committee, in commemoration of the newly post-Apartheid nation’s Bill of Rights. Funds generated from the sale of portfolios are deposited in the Artists for Human Rights Trust account and are used by Amnesty International and other organizations for human rights education programs for the young people of South Africa. This set of prints is being circulated in North America as one of a series of activities between Michigan State University and a consortium of agencies in South Africa, including the African National Congress; Centre for Cultural Studies, University of Fort Hare; and Mayibuye Centre, University of the Western Cape.

I'm Only Here to Leave - Tommy Kha

April 5 - 27, 2019

Tommy Kha is a photographer based between Brooklyn, NY and his hometown, Memphis, TN.

He is a recipient of the En Foco Photography Fellowship, the Jessie and Dolph Smith Emeritus Award, and a former artist-in-residence at Center for Photography at Woodstock, Light Work, Fountainhead, and Baxter Street at the Camera Club of New York. In December 2015, Kha published his first monograph, A Real Imitation, through Aint-Bad. His next book, Soft Murders, will be released Fall 2019.

He was the cover of Vice Magazine’s 2017 Photography Issue and a finalist for the Hyeres Photography 2019 Festival.

Kha holds an MFA in Photography from Yale University.

ArtSource 2019

May 3 - 17, 2019

Carl Sublett - A Centennial Celebration

June 7 - July 113, 2019

This exhibition celebrates the 100th anniversary of his birth. Carl was a longtime faculty member in the painting department in the School of Art and a member of The Knoxville Seven, a group of progressive artists active in the 50s and 60s. The show was proposed by his late son, Eric Sublett, who was a champion of his father’s work and also an alum of the School of Art. Over 20 regional collectors loaned works that were publicly displayed together for the first time. The exhibition featured over 50 watercolors, oils on canvas, original Christmas cards, and comic strips. Carl was a prolific and experimental artist, and this exhibition featured an example of work from every decade of his career with a piece from every series he created.

Howard Hull Paintings: 1989-2019

July 19 - August 17, 2019




You Call That Art!: an exhibition of editorial cartoons by Charlie Daniel

December 4 - January 29, 2016

The exhibition featured a large selection of “Rosy’s Diner” cartoons as well as a variety of subjects and themes from the past two decades. Charlie Daniel came to Knoxville in 1958 as the editorial cartoonist for The Knoxville Journal. He moved to the Knoxville News Sentinel in January 1992 and has been the editorial cartoonist here ever since.

Science and Nature: Larry Brown

February 5 - 27, 2016

Larry Brown is a painter who has taught drawing in the Cooper Union School of Art Since 1991. He received his Bachelor of Arts degree from Washington State University and his Master of Fine Arts degree from the University of Arizona.

Larry’s paintings and works on paper are based on concerns with relative relationships between science and nature. His most recent work is defined by a geo-political narrative focused on ecological and geological tensions related to the environment and climate.

Allison Berkoy - PERFORMANCES / Jonathan Lukens - time-based Visualizations of Local Particulate Matter Data

March 4 - 26, 2016

Allison Berkoy presents recent works in video, electronic sculpture, and interactive installation. The exhibition features performances by tea cups, a cockroach, a clock, projected actors, computer algorithms, and more.

Jonathan Lukens employs design as a means of understanding and explaining relationships beyond the visual. This exhibition presents time-based visualizations of particulate matter data recorded at an air monitoring station near Pearl Place and Stewart Street in Knoxville. Particulate matter is a term for airborne pollution in the form of very small particles which can pass through the throat and nose and enter the lungs.

Modes of Faltering: Shambhavi Kaul

April 1-2, 2016

Artist Shambhavi Kaul premiered her latest video installation, Modes of Faltering, at the UT Downtown Gallery as part of a special exhibition in collaboration with the Big Ears music festival. Kaul's work has been exhibited in galleries and on the film festival circuit, including the Toronto International Film Festival, the Berlinale, the New York Film Festival, the London Film Festival, Rotterdam, the Edinburga International Film Festival, Internationale Kurzfilmtage Oberhausen, the Ann Arbor Film Festival, and the Shanghai Bienniale.

ARTSOURCE 2016

May 6 - 20, 2016

Every day, Knox County art teachers devote their time and energy to cultivating creativity and critical skills in their students. For more than a decade, Art Source, the exhibition dedicated solely to Knox County art educators, has given these same teachers an opportunity to nourish and showcase their own artistic talents.

Through the Lens of Ed Westcott

June 2 - August 6, 2016

In 1942, the Army Corps of Engineers relocated James Edward Westcott to Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and assigned him the task of official photographer for the Manhattan Project - a massive wartime effort to produce the first atomic bomb. As secrecy of the project was paramount, the "atomic" city was fenced, and communication with the outside world was limited. What is more, no cameras were allowed inside its boundaries.

Thus, Westcott became not only the official photographer for the Manhattan Project, but he also became the sole photographer of the social and recreational events of Oak Ridge. It is only through Westcott's photographs that the visual history of Oak Ridge can be appreciated.

Top Soil: Body Farm

August 19 - 27, 2016

Top Soil: Body Farm is an exhibition of the incoming class of 2019 MFA students. The exhibition includes, Printmaking, Transmedia & Design, Painting, Sculpture, Ceramics and installations. These student artists have chosen UTK School of Art as their home for the next three years to complete their Master of Fine Arts Degree. The exhibition highlights their current work and their artistic accomplishments prior to arriving at the University of Tennessee.

Artists included in the exhibition are: Katie Gentner - painting and drawing, University of Wisconsin, Parkside;  Eric Hines - painting and drawing, Ohio State University;  Miles Ingrassia – printmaking, OCAD University, Canada; Holly Kelly – sculpture, Massachusetts College of Art & Design; Cara McKinley – ceramics, Florida Atlantic University; Rachel Sevier – ceramics, Southeastern Louisiana University;  Mengmeng Shang - Transmedia Design, Communication University of China; Lila Shull – printmaking, Winthrop University; Baxter Stults – printmaking, University of Alabama, Huntsville; Michael Tracy - painting and drawing, University of Iowa.

Persona: Process Portraiture

September 2 - 30, 2016

UT Downtown Gallery is pleased to present, Persona: Process Portraiture, and exhibition of work by Leah Schrager, Marcia Goldenstein, Judith Page, and Gail Skudera

 

 

Fired Up! UT Collects Ceramics

October 4 - 29, 2016

UT Downtown Gallery is pleased to present, Fired Up! UT Collects Ceramics, a collection of work from the Ewing Gallery permanent collection as well as from private collections of professors, staff and community members. 

Guts Coming and Going: Jessica Ann

November 4 - 23, 2016

An exhibition of new and recent works by artist Jessica Ann entitled; Guts Coming and Going. Featuring video, sculpture, and interactive installation, the exhibition explores the material potential at the edge of the world wide web. Composed of many parts, each component is networked together by Ann’s desire to meet what she calls the “aggregate monster.” An entity lurking and learning amidst the ever cooled data banks of your external and eternal memory. Data siphoned daily among a trillion other self published transmissions, happening across facebook, text messages, phone calls, emails, twitter, cameras, and networked refrigerators. What fabulation might emerge among all this noise is presented here as objects and subjects oozing off the grid and into mixed reality.

Drawn But Not Forgotten

December 2 - 23, 2016

The UT Downtown Gallery is pleased to present a selection of sketches and lithographs from the Ewing Gallery Permanent Collection. On display are working and finished sketches and print portfolios from four illustrators working during the “Golden Age” of illustration. The four men whose works you see here, worked tirelessly drafting ad campaigns, illustrating children’s books, comic strips, and covers for weekly publications, such as The Saturday Evening Post. The Ewing Gallery is fortunate to have acquired many of these works through generous gifts to the gallery. The 4 drawings on display by F.R. Gruger were given by his son, F.R. Gruger Jr.. The sixteen lithographs illustrating scenes from Mark Twain’s Huckleberry Finn and Tom Sawyer were given by Harold Shaw. Many of the illustrations by Walter Haskell Hinton were given by his son, Ray Hinton and later by his children as part of Ray’s estate. The illustrations and prints by Harrison Cady were gifts of David Eldredge, a nephew of Cady. We hope you enjoy this opportunity to see the works of these four illustrators from the Ewing Collection exhibited together for the first time. Take time to notice each artist’s unique illustration style and choice of media.