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Current + Past Exhibition Images


Violins of Hope

January 10 - February 20, 2019

The Violins of Hope are a collection of restored violins that were played by Jewish musicians during The Holocaust. These instruments have survived concentration camps, pogroms and many long journeys to tell remarkable stories of injustice, suffering, resilience and survival. The collection was assembled and restored by Israeli master violin maker and restorer, Amnon Weinstein.

In some cases, the ability to play the violin spared Jewish musicians from more grueling labors or even death. Nearly 50 years ago, Amnon heard such a story from a customer who brought in an instrument for restoration. The customer survived the Holocaust because his job was to play the violin while Nazi soldiers marched others to their deaths. When Amnon opened the violin’s case, he saw ashes. He thought of his own relatives who had perished and was overwhelmed. He could not bring himself to begin the project.

By 1996, Amnon was ready. He put out a call for violins from the Holocaust that he would restore in hopes that the instruments would sound again.

Amnon started locating violins that were played by Jews in the camps and ghettos, painstakingly piecing them back together so they could be brought to life again on the concert stage. Although most of the musicians who originally played the instruments were silenced by the Holocaust, their voices and spirits live on through the violins that Amnon has lovingly restored. He calls these 50 instruments the Violins of Hope.

Images of Human Rights Portfolio

February 1 - 23, 2019

The South African Bill of Rights was born out of a long struggle against racial segregation and human rights violations. Until the first democratic election in 1994, the majority of South Africans had been excluded from participating in the political process. Talks in the early 1990s between political prisoner Nelson Mandela and then South African leader F.W. DeKlerk ultimately led to free elections and a new government which aimed to respect the rights of all its citizens.

Images of Human Rights features 29 fine art prints, created by artists representing the nine provinces of South Africa and hand printed by master printmaker Jan Jordaan. The print portfolio was conceived of and released in 1996 by the Images of Human Rights Portfolio Committee, in commemoration of the newly post-Apartheid nation’s Bill of Rights. Funds generated from the sale of portfolios are deposited in the Artists for Human Rights Trust account and are used by Amnesty International and other organizations for human rights education programs for the young people of South Africa. This set of prints is being circulated in North America as one of a series of activities between Michigan State University and a consortium of agencies in South Africa, including the African National Congress; Centre for Cultural Studies, University of Fort Hare; and Mayibuye Centre, University of the Western Cape.

I'm Only Here to Leave - Tommy Kha

April 5 - 27, 2019

Tommy Kha is a photographer based between Brooklyn, NY and his hometown, Memphis, TN.

He is a recipient of the En Foco Photography Fellowship, the Jessie and Dolph Smith Emeritus Award, and a former artist-in-residence at Center for Photography at Woodstock, Light Work, Fountainhead, and Baxter Street at the Camera Club of New York. In December 2015, Kha published his first monograph, A Real Imitation, through Aint-Bad. His next book, Soft Murders, will be released Fall 2019.

He was the cover of Vice Magazine’s 2017 Photography Issue and a finalist for the Hyeres Photography 2019 Festival.

Kha holds an MFA in Photography from Yale University.

ArtSource 2019

May 3 - 17, 2019

Carl Sublett - A Centennial Celebration

June 7 - July 113, 2019

This exhibition celebrates the 100th anniversary of his birth. Carl was a longtime faculty member in the painting department in the School of Art and a member of The Knoxville Seven, a group of progressive artists active in the 50s and 60s. The show was proposed by his late son, Eric Sublett, who was a champion of his father’s work and also an alum of the School of Art. Over 20 regional collectors loaned works that were publicly displayed together for the first time. The exhibition featured over 50 watercolors, oils on canvas, original Christmas cards, and comic strips. Carl was a prolific and experimental artist, and this exhibition featured an example of work from every decade of his career with a piece from every series he created.

Howard Hull Paintings: 1989-2019

July 19 - August 17, 2019





Paul Sacaridiz: Configurations

January 23 - February 28, 2015

The work in this exhibition explores the non-objective and propositional quality that sculpture can have, and the ways in which we can understand something devoid of specificity and illustration. Presented on custom-built risers and linear structures, individual components are often physically or conceptually networked together with arrangements of objects ranging from the random and chaotic to the precise and articulate. Through careful positioning and intentional framing the works are suggestive of abstracted models and diagrammatic systems that allude to a sculptural logic that is both pragmatic and allusive at the same time. 

TIme and Again: Ruth Wesiberg

March 6 - 27, 2015

Ruth Weisberg has been an important influence on printmaking both as an artist and educator. Her creative activity and scholarship encompasses not only studio production in printmaking, painting, and drawing, but central and influential articles, essays and book chapters that have played a vital role in advancing print theory. Her 1986 essay “Syntax of the Print” published in the Tamarind Papers is frequently assigned to students in printmaking programs and remains relevant almost 30 years after it was first published. As one of her nominators, Mark Pascale, Associate Curator of Printmaking at the Art Institute of Chicago, praised not only her work as a printmaker and draftsman, he also emphasized her writings as an important contribution to the field of printmaking. Ruth Weisberg is 2015 recipient of the SGC International Printmaker Emeritus Award.

ARTSOURCE 2015

April 3 - 17, 2016

Every day, Knox County art teachers devote their time and energy to cultivating creativity and critical skills in their students. For more than a decade, Art Source, the exhibition dedicated solely to Knox County art educators, has given these same teachers an opportunity to nourish and showcase their own artistic talents.

Strangers and Stand-Ins: Sunita Prasad

April 22-25, 2015

The three works on display express my desire to distill and undermine normative expectations about which behaviors and expressions are appropriate for whom. A choreographic example can be found in Presumptuous?, an ongoing video series shot in cities around the world which disrupts the codes of urban co-existence by inserting hyper-intimate and often queer interactions into public space.

The Civil War Series: Richard J. Lefevre

May 1 - June 27, 2015

Richard J. LeFevre's Civil War Series presents the history of the War Between the States (1861 – 1865) through works on paper that depict 32 of the war's most significant battles. By combining his love of history and his skill as an illustrator, LeFevre used inventive mixed-media techniques to create these powerful images inspired by his personal investigation into that terrible and definitive era.

Land Report

July 3 - 31, 2015

Jason S. Brown, Brian R. Jobe, David L. Jones, Patrick Kikut &
Shelby Shadwell

The Land Report Collective deals with landscape in fundamental ways and as a foundational reference point. Brown considers the politics of mountaintop removal in his construction of objects and installations while also creating playful formal assemblages. Jobe crafts meeting places for public interaction through the delineation of pathways and works with brick and wood. Jones responds to desert environments with experimental interactions, model scale sculpture, and large scale outdoor works. Kikut incorporates a lifelong interest in the horizon line in a series of paintings with flat Midwestern landscapes as his muse. Shadwell views the landscape from a non-traditional lens, responding to ephemeral images from highway road cameras, monumental mining operations and the optical nature of the salt flats through drawing, sculpture and video installation.

Life in Light: An Exhibition of Poems in Paintings

August 7 - 15, 2015

Life in Light is an exhibition of paintings inspired by the poetry of local doctor, Humayun Kabir. Dr. Kabir's poetry has been transformed into image by Bangladeshi artist, Mostafiz Karigar.

Non-Exempt: A Staff Exhibition

September 4 - 26, 2015

Our hardworking staff members step out from behind the scenes and exhibit what they work on when they're not at work. 

Media and subject matter were not stipulated at the outset of this exhibition. The pieces on display, therefore, represent an honest 'work sample' from a talented segment of the UT community in the School of Art and College of Architecture and Design whose artistic skills might otherwise remain unrecognized outside of their duties as staff members.

Devin Balara – Metal Shop Tech, Sculpture/Installation; Mike C. Berry – UT Downtown Gallery Manager, Painting; Eric Cagley – Ewing Gallery Staff, Painting; Debbie Cooper – School of Art Staff, Quilting; Heather Eades– Media Pool, Painting; Jeremy Hammond– Wood Shop Manager, Sculpture; Tally Locke – Fab Lab Manager, Sculpture; Sarah McFalls – Ewing Gallery Staff, Multi-media installation; Hannah Shimabukuro –Printmaking Tech, Installation/photography; Jason Tyler -School of Art Media Tech, Photography

Lorrie Fredette: between locations

October 2 - 31. 2015

Lorrie Fredette creates site-specific investigations that examine beauty, harmony, and comfort to comprehend the incomprehensible aspects of infection, pandemic and the plague.

Her pieces have been exhibited nationally and internationally including solo and group exhibitions in the US and Europe. Exhibition venues include Cynthia –Reeves Project (Brattleboro, VT), Art Southampton (Southampton, NY), Seton Hall University (South Orange, NJ), Bank of America Headquarters (Charlotte, NC) Mass MoCA (North Adams, MA), Cape Cod Museum of Art (Dennis, MA) and Jyvaskyla Art Museum (Jyvaskyla, Finland) Fredette holds a BFA in sculpture from the Herron School of Art / Indiana University. Cynthia-Reeves in New York represents her work.

John Messinger

November 6 - 28, 2015

John Messinger combines elements of photography and tapestry to create large-scale, 3-dimension mixed media artworks. His body of work consists of thousands of individual 3.25” x 4.25” instant photographs assembled together to create photographic tapestries that examine the proliferation and ubiquity of the photograph in the digital age.

Inspired by the notions of singularity and time, Messinger combines hundreds of varying images and transforms them into a single experience. His work fuses indexical and abstract imagery to question the notion of photography, photographer, and subject. 

You Call That Art!: an exhibition of editorial cartoons by Charlie Daniel

December 4 - January 29, 2016

The exhibition featured a large selection of “Rosy’s Diner” cartoons as well as a variety of subjects and themes from the past two decades. Charlie Daniel came to Knoxville in 1958 as the editorial cartoonist for The Knoxville Journal. He moved to the Knoxville News Sentinel in January 1992 and has been the editorial cartoonist here ever since.