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Current + Past Exhibition Images


Violins of Hope

January 10 - February 20, 2019

The Violins of Hope are a collection of restored violins that were played by Jewish musicians during The Holocaust. These instruments have survived concentration camps, pogroms and many long journeys to tell remarkable stories of injustice, suffering, resilience and survival. The collection was assembled and restored by Israeli master violin maker and restorer, Amnon Weinstein.

In some cases, the ability to play the violin spared Jewish musicians from more grueling labors or even death. Nearly 50 years ago, Amnon heard such a story from a customer who brought in an instrument for restoration. The customer survived the Holocaust because his job was to play the violin while Nazi soldiers marched others to their deaths. When Amnon opened the violin’s case, he saw ashes. He thought of his own relatives who had perished and was overwhelmed. He could not bring himself to begin the project.

By 1996, Amnon was ready. He put out a call for violins from the Holocaust that he would restore in hopes that the instruments would sound again.

Amnon started locating violins that were played by Jews in the camps and ghettos, painstakingly piecing them back together so they could be brought to life again on the concert stage. Although most of the musicians who originally played the instruments were silenced by the Holocaust, their voices and spirits live on through the violins that Amnon has lovingly restored. He calls these 50 instruments the Violins of Hope.

Images of Human Rights Portfolio

February 1 - 23, 2019

The South African Bill of Rights was born out of a long struggle against racial segregation and human rights violations. Until the first democratic election in 1994, the majority of South Africans had been excluded from participating in the political process. Talks in the early 1990s between political prisoner Nelson Mandela and then South African leader F.W. DeKlerk ultimately led to free elections and a new government which aimed to respect the rights of all its citizens.

Images of Human Rights features 29 fine art prints, created by artists representing the nine provinces of South Africa and hand printed by master printmaker Jan Jordaan. The print portfolio was conceived of and released in 1996 by the Images of Human Rights Portfolio Committee, in commemoration of the newly post-Apartheid nation’s Bill of Rights. Funds generated from the sale of portfolios are deposited in the Artists for Human Rights Trust account and are used by Amnesty International and other organizations for human rights education programs for the young people of South Africa. This set of prints is being circulated in North America as one of a series of activities between Michigan State University and a consortium of agencies in South Africa, including the African National Congress; Centre for Cultural Studies, University of Fort Hare; and Mayibuye Centre, University of the Western Cape.

I'm Only Here to Leave - Tommy Kha

April 5 - 27, 2019

Tommy Kha is a photographer based between Brooklyn, NY and his hometown, Memphis, TN.

He is a recipient of the En Foco Photography Fellowship, the Jessie and Dolph Smith Emeritus Award, and a former artist-in-residence at Center for Photography at Woodstock, Light Work, Fountainhead, and Baxter Street at the Camera Club of New York. In December 2015, Kha published his first monograph, A Real Imitation, through Aint-Bad. His next book, Soft Murders, will be released Fall 2019.

He was the cover of Vice Magazine’s 2017 Photography Issue and a finalist for the Hyeres Photography 2019 Festival.

Kha holds an MFA in Photography from Yale University.

ArtSource 2019

May 3 - 17, 2019

Carl Sublett - A Centennial Celebration

June 7 - July 113, 2019

This exhibition celebrates the 100th anniversary of his birth. Carl was a longtime faculty member in the painting department in the School of Art and a member of The Knoxville Seven, a group of progressive artists active in the 50s and 60s. The show was proposed by his late son, Eric Sublett, who was a champion of his father’s work and also an alum of the School of Art. Over 20 regional collectors loaned works that were publicly displayed together for the first time. The exhibition featured over 50 watercolors, oils on canvas, original Christmas cards, and comic strips. Carl was a prolific and experimental artist, and this exhibition featured an example of work from every decade of his career with a piece from every series he created.

Howard Hull Paintings: 1989-2019

July 19 - August 17, 2019