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Current + Past Exhibition Images



Stage Left: Christina West

January 24 - March 8, 2018

In this immersive installation, Christina A. West integrates figurative sculptures into a space that is suggestive of a house, playfully alluding to the idea of the home as a stage set.  “Stage left” is a term used in theatre to direct actors as they move around the stage.   Though a term traditionally used to orient, it is used here as a foil to highlight the viewer’s disorientation within the fabricated space, while reinforcing theatrical associations with the installation. As people move through the gallery, spaces recede and reflect, sometimes offering a glimpse into another room, sometimes reflecting back the space one is in, and occasionally reflecting a reflection. Additionally, exposed studs on one side of each wall create a sense of front and back (or stage and backstage) that shifts throughout the gallery.  Objects such as sheets, blinds, and picture frames conjure the context of the home, charging this “stage” with a sense of a private space. As viewers bend, squat, and peek around corners to view tableaus, their own reflections appear throughout the space highlighting their participation in the scenes.

10,000 Shards of Bliss (the rhythm that forgets itself)

March 16 - 31, 2018

For his film installation at The University of Tennessee Knoxville’s Downtown Gallery, in conjunction with the 2018 Big Ears Festival, Los Angeles based collage film artist Lewis Klahr will present a looped, rotating selection of his films that explore the vicissitudes of time and memory. Lewis Klahr uses found images and sound to explore the intersection of memory and history. He is primarily known for his uniquely idiosyncratic films, which he began creating in 1977 and has screened extensively in the U.S., Europe and Asia. Lewis Klahr teaches in the Theater School of the California Institute of the Arts and is represented by The Anthony Reynolds Gallery, London.

On the Fringe of Conformity: Clarence Morgan

April 5 - 28, 2018

This exhibition of drawings and paintings explore linear patterns that operate in a pictorial space. Utilizing random shapes and biomorphic forms within an intricate network of drawing, collage elements, and subtle color, Morgan's work ranges from highly patterned organic painting compositions to meticulously articulated and somewhat minimal collage-drawings. A native of Philadelphia, PA, Clarence Morgan has been a professor in the Department of Art at the University of Minnesota since 1992.

ARTSOURCE 2018

May 4 - May 19, 2018

Every day, Knox County art teachers devote their time and energy to cultivating creativity and critical skills in their students. For more than a decade, ARTSOURCE, the exhibition dedicated solely to Knox County art educators, has given these same teachers an opportunity to nourish and showcase their own artistic talents. 

Celebrating the Life and Art of Kimberly D. Iles

June 1 - July 14, 2018

Kimberly D. Iles was known for her vivacity, generosity of spirit, and passion for the arts. She graduated with honors from the University of Tennessee in 1990, earning a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree. As a graphic designer, she poured her talent and energy into her work for clients ranging from Oak Ridge National Laboratories to the White House tech corps, and started her own very successful design firm, Ilesnet Design. She designed a web-based textbook – the first of its kind – for the Computational Science Education Project, a K-12 educational program to teach the principles of high-performance computing. She later transitioned into a full-time career in fine art, exhibiting her paintings and photographs in juried shows around the world.

Iles and her husband, Dr. James J. Hack, established the Kimberly D. Iles Art Scholarship Endowment in 2015. The endowment supports multiple scholarships awarded annually to undergraduate students in the School of Art. 

The Dirty Dozen - First Year MFA Exhibition

August 31 - September 1, 2018


Exhibiting students are:

Alissa Walls, Washington & Lee University
Quynh Nguyen Duc Diem, University of Architecture, Ho Chi Minh City
Erin Wohletz, University of Nevada-Reno
Mary Climes, Art Institute of Chicago
Gina Stucchio, University of South Florida
Kate Clark, University of Minnesota- Twin Cities
Conor G. McGrann, Syracuse University
Nyasha Madamombe, Chinhoyi University of Technology, Zimbabwe
Lauren Terry, VCU
Lilly Saywitz, Boston University
Kelsie Conley, VCU
Jake Miller, Western Illinois University

Ben Seamons

September 7 - 29, 2018

The UT Downtown Gallery is pleased to present an exhibition of work by Ben Seamons. Ben received his MFA in Painting from the University of Tennessee in 2012. He passed away in 2016, and this exhibition is in celebration of his life.

Chakaia Booker

October 5 - 27, 2018

Sculptor Chakaia Booker fuses ecological concerns with explorations of racial and economic difference, globalization, and gender by recycling discarded tires into complex assemblages.

Booker began to integrate discarded construction materials into large, outdoor sculptures in the early 1990s. Tires resonate with her for their versatility and rich range of historical and cultural associations. Booker slices, twists, weaves, and rivets this medium into radically new forms and textures, which easily withstand outdoor environments.

Portraits - Joseph Delaney

November 2 - December 8, 2018


Meandering Mythologies: Timothy Massey and Gary Monroe

January 6 - 26, 2017

Meandering Mythologies is a two-person exhibition featuring the work of Timothy Massey and Gary Monroe. Timothy Massey is the associate professor of art and chair of the Art Department at SUNY Brockport. He also serves as the director for the Tower Fine Art Gallery at SUNY Brockport. He studied printmaking and drawing at the University of Tennessee and Ohio State University. Gary Monroe is an artist from Knoxville, Tennessee who has exhibited nationally since the 1980’s. Most recently Monroe’s work has been featured in one-person exhibitions at the Estel Gallery, Nashville, TN, in 2011; the Clayton Center for the Arts at Maryville College in 2011; the Leu Art Gallery at Belmont University, Nashville, TN in 2009; and the Cue Art Foundation, New York, NY, in 2006. 

Intersections: an exhibition of glass from Ball State

February 3 - 25, 2017

Ball State University Glick Center for Glass opened in fall 2011 and this relatively new program has made significant grown and national recognition with the support of fellow educators and artists using this medium. Joining Ball State University faculty and students in this exhibit are Jonathan Chapman and Kristin Thielking from the University of Wisconsin, Stevens-Point, and Eoin Breadon from the University of Wisconsin, River Falls. It is through the intersections of Ball State University's students and their mentors that the glass program is evolving from its regional prominence to national recognition.  The glass program, and the Glick Center for Glass at Ball State marks a return of glass production to Muncie. The university gets its name from the Ball brothers who had a food storage manufacturing business in New York and Muncie that made sealable glass jars for home canning – colloquially known as ball jars. In the 1880s glass manufacturing was moved from New York to Muncie due to an abundance of natural gas in the area. By 1917, the brothers had bought the foreclosed Indiana Normal University and gave it to the state of Indiana, creating what would become Ball State University.

Open Ended: films by Kevin Jerome Everson

March 3 - 31, 2017

With a sense of place and historical research, Kevin Jerome Everson's films combine scripted and documentary moments with rich elements of formalism. The subject matter is the gestures or tasks caused by certain physical, social-economic, and environmental conditions in the lives of working class African Americans and other people of African descent. Instead of standard realism he favors a strategy that abstracts everyday actions and statements into theatrical gestures, in which archival footage is re-edited or re-staged, real people perform fictional scenarios based on their own lives and historical observations intermesh with contemporary narratives. The films suggest the relentlessness of everyday life—along with its beauty—but also present oblique metaphors for art-making. This exhibition is in partnership with The Public Cinema and Big Ears music festival.

Breach: Alison Saar

April 7 - 29, 2017

Alison Saar weaves narratives relating to the Great Mississippi Flood of 1927 into the mixed-media sculpture and paintings featured in Breach. Saar explores issues of gender, race, racism, and the African diaspora. She mines mythology, ritual, history, music, and her biracial heritage as sources for her work. During a 2013 residency at the Joan Mitchell Center in New Orleans, Saar was dismayed to see how little had been done to rebuild African American communities devastated by Hurricane Katrina eight years earlier. Upon her return to Los Angeles, she began researching the histories of American floods and the effect on African Americans. The Great Mississippi River Flood of 1927, described as one of the worst natural river disasters in U.S. history, piqued her interest. Heavy rains resulted in the river breaching levees, creating a historic catastrophe that had a profound impact on the life of African Americans living in the Mississippi Delta. The flood exposed the conditions of poor African American sharecroppers and tenant farmers and their relationship with cotton plantation owners. The flood also resulted in social, cultural, federal policy, and political changes. With water imagery woven throughout, Breach is the culmination of Saar’s creative research on American rivers and their historical relationship to the lives of African Americans. Through mixed media sculpture, paintings, and works on paper, she explores floods not only as natural phenomena; but also the complex interaction of social, cultural, and political factors associated with flooding and its aftermath.

ARTSOURCE 2017

Every day, Knox County art teachers devote their time and energy to cultivating creativity and critical skills in their students. For more than a decade, Art Source, the exhibition dedicated solely to Knox County art educators, has given these same teachers an opportunity to nourish and showcase their own artistic talents.

Living On: Tennessee Survivors and Liberators

June 2 - July 27, 2017

The UT Downtown Gallery is pleased to present Living On an exhibition of 24 portraits of holocaust survivors and liberators living in Tennessee by Robert Heller. Heller, a professor in the School of Journalism and Electronic Media at the University of Tennessee since 1986, received his B.S. and M.A. degrees in photojournalism from Syracuse University. He taught photography and graphics for five years at the University of Miami, and was publications designer and photographer at the State University of New York College at New Paltz, and Elmira College in New York. Heller also taught photography at The Center for Photography at Woodstock, New York. His photographs have been selected for numerous juried exhibitions and he continues to do freelance work in both graphic design and photography. Living On is a project of the Tennessee Holocaust Commission, which is funded by an annual appropriation from the Tennessee State Legislature and by private donations. Assistance in the development of this documentary project was provided, as well, by the Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany, Inc. The traveling exhibition was curated by Susan W. Knowles.

 

Reprocessed

August 4 - 19, 2017

Reprocessed is an exhibition of art by three Knoxville artists who use found imagery and materials to create their unique pieces. The UT Downtown Gallery is pleased to display woven work by Judi Gaston and mixed media pieces by Kelly Hider and Beth Meadows. Judi Gaston recalls as a child poring over books with photographs of exotic places. Now she seizes every opportunity to visit far away lands – Kenya, India, Peru, the Amazon Basin, Australia, Samoa… She tries to incorporate some of the contributions that these cultures have made, blending them in new and distinctive forms using old buttons, beads, patching, knotting and embroidery techniques in her woven clothing. Along with her wearable fashions, she also designs a recycled wearable art series. She likes making wearables that have a history of having lived previous lives. Beth Meadows‘ artwork is inspired by fashion and design, folk art, children’s books, and the strength, confidence, and beauty of women. She lives and works in Knoxville, Tennessee. Kelly Hider was raised in Rochester, NY. She received her BFA from SUNY Brockport in 2007, and an MFA from the University of Tennessee in 2011. She is a founding member of the Vacuum Shop Studios, where her studio is currently located, and is Co-Chair of the Dogwood Regional Fine Arts Exhibit. Hider is the Gallery Coordinator at Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts and resides in Knoxville, TN.

 
Dual Current: Inseparable Elements in Painting and Architecture

September 1 - October 7, 2017

Dual Current: Inseparable Elements in Painting and Architecture, curated by Gabriele Evertz, examines the relationship between painting and architecture in a contemporary context through color, shape, and theory. The artists whose works are featured in this exhibition are: Josef Albers (American, born Germany, 1888–1976), Matthew Deleget (American, born 1972), Peter Dudek (American, born 1952), Cris Gianakos (Greek-American, born 1934), Michelle Grabner (American, born 1962), Lynne Harlow (American, born 1968), Changha Hwang (Korean, born 1969), Russell Maltz (American, born 1952), Rossana Martinez (Puerto Rican, born 1969), Kristine Marx (American, born 1969), and Manfred Mohr (German, born 1938). Their works link three-dimensional space and the picture plane to create radical new forms. 

Morehshin Allahyari

October 20 - November 22, 2017

Morehshin Allahyari is an artist, activist, educator, and occasional curator. She is the recipient of the leading global thinkers of 2016 award by Foreign Policy magazine. Morehshin was born and raised in Iran and moved to the United States in 2007. Her work deals with the political, social, and cultural contradictions we face every day. She thinks about technology as a philosophical toolset to reflect on objects and as a poetic means to document our personal and collective lives struggles in the 21st century. Morehshin is the co-author of The 3D Additivist Cookbook in collaboration with writer/artist Daniel Rourke– (published on December 2016 online in 3DPDF format and in print by the Institute of Networked Cultures). Her modeled, 3D-printed sculptural reconstructions of ancient artifacts destroyed by ISIS, titled Material Speculation: ISIS, have received widespread curatorial and press attention and have been exhibited worldwide.

Nocturnal Suns

December 1, 2017 - January 6, 2018

An exhibition of work by 4 professors from the University of Tennessee School of Art: Emily Bivens, 4D;  John Kelley, 4D,  Mary Laube, painting; and John Powers, sculpture. 


You Call That Art!: an exhibition of editorial cartoons by Charlie Daniel

December 4 - January 29, 2016

The exhibition featured a large selection of “Rosy’s Diner” cartoons as well as a variety of subjects and themes from the past two decades. Charlie Daniel came to Knoxville in 1958 as the editorial cartoonist for The Knoxville Journal. He moved to the Knoxville News Sentinel in January 1992 and has been the editorial cartoonist here ever since.

Science and Nature: Larry Brown

February 5 - 27, 2016

Larry Brown is a painter who has taught drawing in the Cooper Union School of Art Since 1991. He received his Bachelor of Arts degree from Washington State University and his Master of Fine Arts degree from the University of Arizona.

Larry’s paintings and works on paper are based on concerns with relative relationships between science and nature. His most recent work is defined by a geo-political narrative focused on ecological and geological tensions related to the environment and climate.

Allison Berkoy - PERFORMANCES / Jonathan Lukens - time-based Visualizations of Local Particulate Matter Data

March 4 - 26, 2016

Allison Berkoy presents recent works in video, electronic sculpture, and interactive installation. The exhibition features performances by tea cups, a cockroach, a clock, projected actors, computer algorithms, and more.

Jonathan Lukens employs design as a means of understanding and explaining relationships beyond the visual. This exhibition presents time-based visualizations of particulate matter data recorded at an air monitoring station near Pearl Place and Stewart Street in Knoxville. Particulate matter is a term for airborne pollution in the form of very small particles which can pass through the throat and nose and enter the lungs.

Modes of Faltering: Shambhavi Kaul

April 1-2, 2016

Artist Shambhavi Kaul premiered her latest video installation, Modes of Faltering, at the UT Downtown Gallery as part of a special exhibition in collaboration with the Big Ears music festival. Kaul's work has been exhibited in galleries and on the film festival circuit, including the Toronto International Film Festival, the Berlinale, the New York Film Festival, the London Film Festival, Rotterdam, the Edinburga International Film Festival, Internationale Kurzfilmtage Oberhausen, the Ann Arbor Film Festival, and the Shanghai Bienniale.

ARTSOURCE 2016

May 6 - 20, 2016

Every day, Knox County art teachers devote their time and energy to cultivating creativity and critical skills in their students. For more than a decade, Art Source, the exhibition dedicated solely to Knox County art educators, has given these same teachers an opportunity to nourish and showcase their own artistic talents.

Through the Lens of Ed Westcott

June 2 - August 6, 2016

In 1942, the Army Corps of Engineers relocated James Edward Westcott to Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and assigned him the task of official photographer for the Manhattan Project - a massive wartime effort to produce the first atomic bomb. As secrecy of the project was paramount, the "atomic" city was fenced, and communication with the outside world was limited. What is more, no cameras were allowed inside its boundaries.

Thus, Westcott became not only the official photographer for the Manhattan Project, but he also became the sole photographer of the social and recreational events of Oak Ridge. It is only through Westcott's photographs that the visual history of Oak Ridge can be appreciated.

Top Soil: Body Farm

August 19 - 27, 2016

Top Soil: Body Farm is an exhibition of the incoming class of 2019 MFA students. The exhibition includes, Printmaking, Transmedia & Design, Painting, Sculpture, Ceramics and installations. These student artists have chosen UTK School of Art as their home for the next three years to complete their Master of Fine Arts Degree. The exhibition highlights their current work and their artistic accomplishments prior to arriving at the University of Tennessee.

Artists included in the exhibition are: Katie Gentner - painting and drawing, University of Wisconsin, Parkside;  Eric Hines - painting and drawing, Ohio State University;  Miles Ingrassia – printmaking, OCAD University, Canada; Holly Kelly – sculpture, Massachusetts College of Art & Design; Cara McKinley – ceramics, Florida Atlantic University; Rachel Sevier – ceramics, Southeastern Louisiana University;  Mengmeng Shang - Transmedia Design, Communication University of China; Lila Shull – printmaking, Winthrop University; Baxter Stults – printmaking, University of Alabama, Huntsville; Michael Tracy - painting and drawing, University of Iowa.

Persona: Process Portraiture

September 2 - 30, 2016

UT Downtown Gallery is pleased to present, Persona: Process Portraiture, and exhibition of work by Leah Schrager, Marcia Goldenstein, Judith Page, and Gail Skudera

 

 

Fired Up! UT Collects Ceramics

October 4 - 29, 2016

UT Downtown Gallery is pleased to present, Fired Up! UT Collects Ceramics, a collection of work from the Ewing Gallery permanent collection as well as from private collections of professors, staff and community members. 

Guts Coming and Going: Jessica Ann

November 4 - 23, 2016

An exhibition of new and recent works by artist Jessica Ann entitled; Guts Coming and Going. Featuring video, sculpture, and interactive installation, the exhibition explores the material potential at the edge of the world wide web. Composed of many parts, each component is networked together by Ann’s desire to meet what she calls the “aggregate monster.” An entity lurking and learning amidst the ever cooled data banks of your external and eternal memory. Data siphoned daily among a trillion other self published transmissions, happening across facebook, text messages, phone calls, emails, twitter, cameras, and networked refrigerators. What fabulation might emerge among all this noise is presented here as objects and subjects oozing off the grid and into mixed reality.

Drawn But Not Forgotten

December 2 - 23, 2016

The UT Downtown Gallery is pleased to present a selection of sketches and lithographs from the Ewing Gallery Permanent Collection. On display are working and finished sketches and print portfolios from four illustrators working during the “Golden Age” of illustration. The four men whose works you see here, worked tirelessly drafting ad campaigns, illustrating children’s books, comic strips, and covers for weekly publications, such as The Saturday Evening Post. The Ewing Gallery is fortunate to have acquired many of these works through generous gifts to the gallery. The 4 drawings on display by F.R. Gruger were given by his son, F.R. Gruger Jr.. The sixteen lithographs illustrating scenes from Mark Twain’s Huckleberry Finn and Tom Sawyer were given by Harold Shaw. Many of the illustrations by Walter Haskell Hinton were given by his son, Ray Hinton and later by his children as part of Ray’s estate. The illustrations and prints by Harrison Cady were gifts of David Eldredge, a nephew of Cady. We hope you enjoy this opportunity to see the works of these four illustrators from the Ewing Collection exhibited together for the first time. Take time to notice each artist’s unique illustration style and choice of media.

 



Death Rock City: Dannielle Tegeder

January 24 - February 28, 2014

Featuring new and recent work, Death Rock City examines how New York artist Dannielle Tegeder challenges the two-dimensional boundaries of traditional painting through the integration of animation, sculpture into her work.

Dannielle Tegeder earned her BFA from the State University of New York at Purchase and her MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. She has had solo gallery exhibitions in Paris, Berlin, New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, and Houston and participated in numerous group exhibitions at PS1/MoMA, The New Museum, The Brooklyn Museum, and the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago.Her work is in the collections of a number of museums including the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago, and the Weatherspoon Art Museum at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

New Topology: Paul Krainak

March 7 - March 29, 2014

"Topology" employs elements of early modern logic and its attendant forms in art and technology. It considers aesthetic and industrial incentives originating in rural America and calls into question modernism's strictly urban mythology. Grids, cruciforms, and wood grain details are embedded in extended patterns calling to mind Constructivist and Bauhaus Schools' principals of industrial hybridity and utopianism. But the site of industry here is agriculture with distilled forms taken from domestic textile design, land management diagrams, and vernacular architecture.

Paul Krainak is an artist, critic, and Chair of the Art Department at Bradley University. 

NEXUS 2014

April 4 - 19, 2014

As one of the Dogwood Arts Festival's featured exhibits, NEXUS, showcases national and international artists working in contemporary sculpture and 3D media. Indoor sculptures comprising all styles and genres from emerging and established artists will be selected by esteemed professor, Laticia Bajuyo, for exhibition at the University of Tennessee's Downtown Gallery.

ARTSOURCE 2014

May 2 - May 22, 2014

Every day, Knox County art teachers devote their time and energy to cultivating creativity and critical skills in their students. For more than a decade, Art Source, the exhibition dedicated solely to Knox County art educators, has given these same teachers an opportunity to nourish and showcase their own artistic talents.

Marion Greenwood in Tennessee

June 6 - August 9, 2014

Marion Greenwood in Tennessee features her mural of the history of Tennessee music painted for the University Center at the University of Tennessee in 1954; "The Partnership of Man and Nature," a WPA mural painted in 1940, graciously loaned by the Crossville, TN Post Office; preparatory sketches loaned by UT Special Collections; and lithographs from the permanent collection of the Ewing Gallery of Art and Architecture. 

Ask Me, I can Help.

August 22 - 23, 2014

An exhibition of the incoming class of 2017 MFA candidates. Twelve student artists feature their current work as they begin their graduate studies at the University of Tennessee, School of Art. Exhibiting students are: Corinna Ray, Anna Wehrwein, Jing Qin, Josh Shorey, Jessica Gatlin, Abigail Lucien, Elysia Mann, Adam Higgins, Meg Erlewine, Geoff Silvis, Chris Spurgin, and Bailey Davenport.

AIR of UT

September 5 - 27, 2014

Air of UT is an exhibition of the Limited Box Edition project, curated by artists Wade Guyton '95, Josh Smith '98, and Meredyth Sparks '94.

The Limited Box Edition project is part of a fund raising campaign to support the School of Art's Artist-in-Residence in Painting and Drawing program. Now in its 32nd year, the Artist-in-Residence (A.I.R.) program enriches a student's experience by bringing a different artist to spend the semester teaching undergraduate and graduate students. The resident artists are selected because they have launched successful careers in the contemporary gallery and museum world nationally and internationally. They furnish students with significant role models and faculty with new professional connections beyond Knoxville.

Each of the organizing alumni -- Wade Guyton, Meredyth Sparks, and Josh Smith -- benefited from this program, and have asked their former School of Art peers as well as past Artists in Residence to contribute images to the three curated portfolios making up the Limited Box Edition. AIR of UT and the Limited Box Edition is a celebration of the legacy and impact of the Artist in Residence program on the School of Art and its graduates.

DeWitt Godfrey: Drawings, Proposals, Plans, Models, Diagrams, Documents

October 3 - 31, 2014

DeWitt Godfrey is a Professor of sculpture in the department of Art and Art History at Colgate.  Godfrey completed his undergraduate work at Yale University, was a member of the inaugural group of CORE Fellows at the MFA Houston, and received his MFA from Edinburgh College of Art, Edinburgh, Scotland. He is the recipient of numerous grants and fellowships, including a National Endowment for the Arts Artist's Fellowship, a New York Foundation for the Arts Artists Fellowship, a Japan Foundation Artist's Fellowship, and a Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation Artist Fellowship. His work is in the collections of the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Texas and the Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, New York. His commissioned work includes "Concordia" for Lexarts, Lexington, KY; "Waverly Place" Cambridge Arts Council; "Greenwich South" a visioning exercise by the Downtown Alliance, New York, NY and installations at Frederik Meijer Garden and Sculpture Park, Grand Rapids, MI; The DeCordova Museum and Sculpture Park, Lincoln, MA; and the Kennedy Art Museum, Ohio University, Athens, OH.

Louis Chan: My Home

November 7 - 26, 2016

My Home is an on-going project aimed to help define my identity as a Chinese American and attempt to preserve generations of memories and experiences of Chinese immigrants through photography. My Home serves as a contemporary marker for Chinese Americans to reflect on the hopes, dreams, and sacrifices made for them by older generations in order for their children to have a chance of a better life in America.

Of A Feather

December 5, 2014 - January 15, 2015 

Artists throughout history have found inspiration in the form of birds. Man imbued birds with mystical and religious meaning due to their fascinating ability to exist in two worlds – the earthly world, and the sky, or heavenly realm. Drawn primarily from the Ewing Gallery’s permanent collection, Of a Feather features works from historic and contemporary artists who represent birds in a diverse assortment of styles. While some artists approach the bird as studies of simplified form others utilize strategies of space and distance to take a more poetic or analytical look at the economic and social issues attached to birds. Works range from hyperrealism to whimsical to abstract. This exhibition incorporates a number of artists of artists from New York and Chicago including Keith Haring, Michael Kirk, Keith Long, Diane Churchill, and Laurie Hogin; regional artists, Howard Finster, Todd Johnson, Kelly Hider, Heather Middlebrooks, Gary Monroe, and Richard Jolley, as well as distinguished faculty from the University of Tennessee – Jered Sprecher, Diane Fox, Beauvais Lyons, Marcia Goldenstein, Don Kurka, Bill Kennedy, Clark Stewart and Byron McKeeby. The artworks on display consider themes of scientific inquiry, symbolism, environmental consciousness, and the rituals of birding, among others. The exhibition is in tribute to the late artist Ellen Lanyon who often used images of birds in her art.