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Current + Past Exhibition Images



Stage Left: Christina West

January 24 - March 8, 2018

In this immersive installation, Christina A. West integrates figurative sculptures into a space that is suggestive of a house, playfully alluding to the idea of the home as a stage set.  “Stage left” is a term used in theatre to direct actors as they move around the stage.   Though a term traditionally used to orient, it is used here as a foil to highlight the viewer’s disorientation within the fabricated space, while reinforcing theatrical associations with the installation. As people move through the gallery, spaces recede and reflect, sometimes offering a glimpse into another room, sometimes reflecting back the space one is in, and occasionally reflecting a reflection. Additionally, exposed studs on one side of each wall create a sense of front and back (or stage and backstage) that shifts throughout the gallery.  Objects such as sheets, blinds, and picture frames conjure the context of the home, charging this “stage” with a sense of a private space. As viewers bend, squat, and peek around corners to view tableaus, their own reflections appear throughout the space highlighting their participation in the scenes.

10,000 Shards of Bliss (the rhythm that forgets itself)

March 16 - 31, 2018

For his film installation at The University of Tennessee Knoxville’s Downtown Gallery, in conjunction with the 2018 Big Ears Festival, Los Angeles based collage film artist Lewis Klahr will present a looped, rotating selection of his films that explore the vicissitudes of time and memory. Lewis Klahr uses found images and sound to explore the intersection of memory and history. He is primarily known for his uniquely idiosyncratic films, which he began creating in 1977 and has screened extensively in the U.S., Europe and Asia. Lewis Klahr teaches in the Theater School of the California Institute of the Arts and is represented by The Anthony Reynolds Gallery, London.

On the Fringe of Conformity: Clarence Morgan

April 5 - 28, 2018

This exhibition of drawings and paintings explore linear patterns that operate in a pictorial space. Utilizing random shapes and biomorphic forms within an intricate network of drawing, collage elements, and subtle color, Morgan's work ranges from highly patterned organic painting compositions to meticulously articulated and somewhat minimal collage-drawings. A native of Philadelphia, PA, Clarence Morgan has been a professor in the Department of Art at the University of Minnesota since 1992.

ARTSOURCE 2018

May 4 - May 19, 2018

Every day, Knox County art teachers devote their time and energy to cultivating creativity and critical skills in their students. For more than a decade, ARTSOURCE, the exhibition dedicated solely to Knox County art educators, has given these same teachers an opportunity to nourish and showcase their own artistic talents. 

Celebrating the Life and Art of Kimberly D. Iles

June 1 - July 14, 2018

Kimberly D. Iles was known for her vivacity, generosity of spirit, and passion for the arts. She graduated with honors from the University of Tennessee in 1990, earning a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree. As a graphic designer, she poured her talent and energy into her work for clients ranging from Oak Ridge National Laboratories to the White House tech corps, and started her own very successful design firm, Ilesnet Design. She designed a web-based textbook – the first of its kind – for the Computational Science Education Project, a K-12 educational program to teach the principles of high-performance computing. She later transitioned into a full-time career in fine art, exhibiting her paintings and photographs in juried shows around the world.

Iles and her husband, Dr. James J. Hack, established the Kimberly D. Iles Art Scholarship Endowment in 2015. The endowment supports multiple scholarships awarded annually to undergraduate students in the School of Art. 

The Dirty Dozen - First Year MFA Exhibition

August 31 - September 1, 2018


Exhibiting students are:

Alissa Walls, Washington & Lee University
Quynh Nguyen Duc Diem, University of Architecture, Ho Chi Minh City
Erin Wohletz, University of Nevada-Reno
Mary Climes, Art Institute of Chicago
Gina Stucchio, University of South Florida
Kate Clark, University of Minnesota- Twin Cities
Conor G. McGrann, Syracuse University
Nyasha Madamombe, Chinhoyi University of Technology, Zimbabwe
Lauren Terry, VCU
Lilly Saywitz, Boston University
Kelsie Conley, VCU
Jake Miller, Western Illinois University

Ben Seamons

September 7 - 29, 2018

The UT Downtown Gallery is pleased to present an exhibition of work by Ben Seamons. Ben received his MFA in Painting from the University of Tennessee in 2012. He passed away in 2016, and this exhibition is in celebration of his life.

Chakaia Booker

October 5 - 27, 2018

Sculptor Chakaia Booker fuses ecological concerns with explorations of racial and economic difference, globalization, and gender by recycling discarded tires into complex assemblages.

Booker began to integrate discarded construction materials into large, outdoor sculptures in the early 1990s. Tires resonate with her for their versatility and rich range of historical and cultural associations. Booker slices, twists, weaves, and rivets this medium into radically new forms and textures, which easily withstand outdoor environments.

Portraits - Joseph Delaney

November 2 - December 8, 2018


Meandering Mythologies: Timothy Massey and Gary Monroe

January 6 - 26, 2017

Meandering Mythologies is a two-person exhibition featuring the work of Timothy Massey and Gary Monroe. Timothy Massey is the associate professor of art and chair of the Art Department at SUNY Brockport. He also serves as the director for the Tower Fine Art Gallery at SUNY Brockport. He studied printmaking and drawing at the University of Tennessee and Ohio State University. Gary Monroe is an artist from Knoxville, Tennessee who has exhibited nationally since the 1980’s. Most recently Monroe’s work has been featured in one-person exhibitions at the Estel Gallery, Nashville, TN, in 2011; the Clayton Center for the Arts at Maryville College in 2011; the Leu Art Gallery at Belmont University, Nashville, TN in 2009; and the Cue Art Foundation, New York, NY, in 2006. 

Intersections: an exhibition of glass from Ball State

February 3 - 25, 2017

Ball State University Glick Center for Glass opened in fall 2011 and this relatively new program has made significant grown and national recognition with the support of fellow educators and artists using this medium. Joining Ball State University faculty and students in this exhibit are Jonathan Chapman and Kristin Thielking from the University of Wisconsin, Stevens-Point, and Eoin Breadon from the University of Wisconsin, River Falls. It is through the intersections of Ball State University's students and their mentors that the glass program is evolving from its regional prominence to national recognition.  The glass program, and the Glick Center for Glass at Ball State marks a return of glass production to Muncie. The university gets its name from the Ball brothers who had a food storage manufacturing business in New York and Muncie that made sealable glass jars for home canning – colloquially known as ball jars. In the 1880s glass manufacturing was moved from New York to Muncie due to an abundance of natural gas in the area. By 1917, the brothers had bought the foreclosed Indiana Normal University and gave it to the state of Indiana, creating what would become Ball State University.

Open Ended: films by Kevin Jerome Everson

March 3 - 31, 2017

With a sense of place and historical research, Kevin Jerome Everson's films combine scripted and documentary moments with rich elements of formalism. The subject matter is the gestures or tasks caused by certain physical, social-economic, and environmental conditions in the lives of working class African Americans and other people of African descent. Instead of standard realism he favors a strategy that abstracts everyday actions and statements into theatrical gestures, in which archival footage is re-edited or re-staged, real people perform fictional scenarios based on their own lives and historical observations intermesh with contemporary narratives. The films suggest the relentlessness of everyday life—along with its beauty—but also present oblique metaphors for art-making. This exhibition is in partnership with The Public Cinema and Big Ears music festival.

Breach: Alison Saar

April 7 - 29, 2017

Alison Saar weaves narratives relating to the Great Mississippi Flood of 1927 into the mixed-media sculpture and paintings featured in Breach. Saar explores issues of gender, race, racism, and the African diaspora. She mines mythology, ritual, history, music, and her biracial heritage as sources for her work. During a 2013 residency at the Joan Mitchell Center in New Orleans, Saar was dismayed to see how little had been done to rebuild African American communities devastated by Hurricane Katrina eight years earlier. Upon her return to Los Angeles, she began researching the histories of American floods and the effect on African Americans. The Great Mississippi River Flood of 1927, described as one of the worst natural river disasters in U.S. history, piqued her interest. Heavy rains resulted in the river breaching levees, creating a historic catastrophe that had a profound impact on the life of African Americans living in the Mississippi Delta. The flood exposed the conditions of poor African American sharecroppers and tenant farmers and their relationship with cotton plantation owners. The flood also resulted in social, cultural, federal policy, and political changes. With water imagery woven throughout, Breach is the culmination of Saar’s creative research on American rivers and their historical relationship to the lives of African Americans. Through mixed media sculpture, paintings, and works on paper, she explores floods not only as natural phenomena; but also the complex interaction of social, cultural, and political factors associated with flooding and its aftermath.

ARTSOURCE 2017

Every day, Knox County art teachers devote their time and energy to cultivating creativity and critical skills in their students. For more than a decade, Art Source, the exhibition dedicated solely to Knox County art educators, has given these same teachers an opportunity to nourish and showcase their own artistic talents.

Living On: Tennessee Survivors and Liberators

June 2 - July 27, 2017

The UT Downtown Gallery is pleased to present Living On an exhibition of 24 portraits of holocaust survivors and liberators living in Tennessee by Robert Heller. Heller, a professor in the School of Journalism and Electronic Media at the University of Tennessee since 1986, received his B.S. and M.A. degrees in photojournalism from Syracuse University. He taught photography and graphics for five years at the University of Miami, and was publications designer and photographer at the State University of New York College at New Paltz, and Elmira College in New York. Heller also taught photography at The Center for Photography at Woodstock, New York. His photographs have been selected for numerous juried exhibitions and he continues to do freelance work in both graphic design and photography. Living On is a project of the Tennessee Holocaust Commission, which is funded by an annual appropriation from the Tennessee State Legislature and by private donations. Assistance in the development of this documentary project was provided, as well, by the Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany, Inc. The traveling exhibition was curated by Susan W. Knowles.

 

Reprocessed

August 4 - 19, 2017

Reprocessed is an exhibition of art by three Knoxville artists who use found imagery and materials to create their unique pieces. The UT Downtown Gallery is pleased to display woven work by Judi Gaston and mixed media pieces by Kelly Hider and Beth Meadows. Judi Gaston recalls as a child poring over books with photographs of exotic places. Now she seizes every opportunity to visit far away lands – Kenya, India, Peru, the Amazon Basin, Australia, Samoa… She tries to incorporate some of the contributions that these cultures have made, blending them in new and distinctive forms using old buttons, beads, patching, knotting and embroidery techniques in her woven clothing. Along with her wearable fashions, she also designs a recycled wearable art series. She likes making wearables that have a history of having lived previous lives. Beth Meadows‘ artwork is inspired by fashion and design, folk art, children’s books, and the strength, confidence, and beauty of women. She lives and works in Knoxville, Tennessee. Kelly Hider was raised in Rochester, NY. She received her BFA from SUNY Brockport in 2007, and an MFA from the University of Tennessee in 2011. She is a founding member of the Vacuum Shop Studios, where her studio is currently located, and is Co-Chair of the Dogwood Regional Fine Arts Exhibit. Hider is the Gallery Coordinator at Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts and resides in Knoxville, TN.

 
Dual Current: Inseparable Elements in Painting and Architecture

September 1 - October 7, 2017

Dual Current: Inseparable Elements in Painting and Architecture, curated by Gabriele Evertz, examines the relationship between painting and architecture in a contemporary context through color, shape, and theory. The artists whose works are featured in this exhibition are: Josef Albers (American, born Germany, 1888–1976), Matthew Deleget (American, born 1972), Peter Dudek (American, born 1952), Cris Gianakos (Greek-American, born 1934), Michelle Grabner (American, born 1962), Lynne Harlow (American, born 1968), Changha Hwang (Korean, born 1969), Russell Maltz (American, born 1952), Rossana Martinez (Puerto Rican, born 1969), Kristine Marx (American, born 1969), and Manfred Mohr (German, born 1938). Their works link three-dimensional space and the picture plane to create radical new forms. 

Morehshin Allahyari

October 20 - November 22, 2017

Morehshin Allahyari is an artist, activist, educator, and occasional curator. She is the recipient of the leading global thinkers of 2016 award by Foreign Policy magazine. Morehshin was born and raised in Iran and moved to the United States in 2007. Her work deals with the political, social, and cultural contradictions we face every day. She thinks about technology as a philosophical toolset to reflect on objects and as a poetic means to document our personal and collective lives struggles in the 21st century. Morehshin is the co-author of The 3D Additivist Cookbook in collaboration with writer/artist Daniel Rourke– (published on December 2016 online in 3DPDF format and in print by the Institute of Networked Cultures). Her modeled, 3D-printed sculptural reconstructions of ancient artifacts destroyed by ISIS, titled Material Speculation: ISIS, have received widespread curatorial and press attention and have been exhibited worldwide.

Nocturnal Suns

December 1, 2017 - January 6, 2018

An exhibition of work by 4 professors from the University of Tennessee School of Art: Emily Bivens, 4D;  John Kelley, 4D,  Mary Laube, painting; and John Powers, sculpture. 



Paul Sacaridiz: Configurations

January 23 - February 28, 2015

The work in this exhibition explores the non-objective and propositional quality that sculpture can have, and the ways in which we can understand something devoid of specificity and illustration. Presented on custom-built risers and linear structures, individual components are often physically or conceptually networked together with arrangements of objects ranging from the random and chaotic to the precise and articulate. Through careful positioning and intentional framing the works are suggestive of abstracted models and diagrammatic systems that allude to a sculptural logic that is both pragmatic and allusive at the same time. 

TIme and Again: Ruth Wesiberg

March 6 - 27, 2015

Ruth Weisberg has been an important influence on printmaking both as an artist and educator. Her creative activity and scholarship encompasses not only studio production in printmaking, painting, and drawing, but central and influential articles, essays and book chapters that have played a vital role in advancing print theory. Her 1986 essay “Syntax of the Print” published in the Tamarind Papers is frequently assigned to students in printmaking programs and remains relevant almost 30 years after it was first published. As one of her nominators, Mark Pascale, Associate Curator of Printmaking at the Art Institute of Chicago, praised not only her work as a printmaker and draftsman, he also emphasized her writings as an important contribution to the field of printmaking. Ruth Weisberg is 2015 recipient of the SGC International Printmaker Emeritus Award.

ARTSOURCE 2015

April 3 - 17, 2016

Every day, Knox County art teachers devote their time and energy to cultivating creativity and critical skills in their students. For more than a decade, Art Source, the exhibition dedicated solely to Knox County art educators, has given these same teachers an opportunity to nourish and showcase their own artistic talents.

Strangers and Stand-Ins: Sunita Prasad

April 22-25, 2015

The three works on display express my desire to distill and undermine normative expectations about which behaviors and expressions are appropriate for whom. A choreographic example can be found in Presumptuous?, an ongoing video series shot in cities around the world which disrupts the codes of urban co-existence by inserting hyper-intimate and often queer interactions into public space.

The Civil War Series: Richard J. Lefevre

May 1 - June 27, 2015

Richard J. LeFevre's Civil War Series presents the history of the War Between the States (1861 – 1865) through works on paper that depict 32 of the war's most significant battles. By combining his love of history and his skill as an illustrator, LeFevre used inventive mixed-media techniques to create these powerful images inspired by his personal investigation into that terrible and definitive era.

Land Report

July 3 - 31, 2015

Jason S. Brown, Brian R. Jobe, David L. Jones, Patrick Kikut &
Shelby Shadwell

The Land Report Collective deals with landscape in fundamental ways and as a foundational reference point. Brown considers the politics of mountaintop removal in his construction of objects and installations while also creating playful formal assemblages. Jobe crafts meeting places for public interaction through the delineation of pathways and works with brick and wood. Jones responds to desert environments with experimental interactions, model scale sculpture, and large scale outdoor works. Kikut incorporates a lifelong interest in the horizon line in a series of paintings with flat Midwestern landscapes as his muse. Shadwell views the landscape from a non-traditional lens, responding to ephemeral images from highway road cameras, monumental mining operations and the optical nature of the salt flats through drawing, sculpture and video installation.

Life in Light: An Exhibition of Poems in Paintings

August 7 - 15, 2015

Life in Light is an exhibition of paintings inspired by the poetry of local doctor, Humayun Kabir. Dr. Kabir's poetry has been transformed into image by Bangladeshi artist, Mostafiz Karigar.

Non-Exempt: A Staff Exhibition

September 4 - 26, 2015

Our hardworking staff members step out from behind the scenes and exhibit what they work on when they're not at work. 

Media and subject matter were not stipulated at the outset of this exhibition. The pieces on display, therefore, represent an honest 'work sample' from a talented segment of the UT community in the School of Art and College of Architecture and Design whose artistic skills might otherwise remain unrecognized outside of their duties as staff members.

Devin Balara – Metal Shop Tech, Sculpture/Installation; Mike C. Berry – UT Downtown Gallery Manager, Painting; Eric Cagley – Ewing Gallery Staff, Painting; Debbie Cooper – School of Art Staff, Quilting; Heather Eades– Media Pool, Painting; Jeremy Hammond– Wood Shop Manager, Sculpture; Tally Locke – Fab Lab Manager, Sculpture; Sarah McFalls – Ewing Gallery Staff, Multi-media installation; Hannah Shimabukuro –Printmaking Tech, Installation/photography; Jason Tyler -School of Art Media Tech, Photography

Lorrie Fredette: between locations

October 2 - 31. 2015

Lorrie Fredette creates site-specific investigations that examine beauty, harmony, and comfort to comprehend the incomprehensible aspects of infection, pandemic and the plague.

Her pieces have been exhibited nationally and internationally including solo and group exhibitions in the US and Europe. Exhibition venues include Cynthia –Reeves Project (Brattleboro, VT), Art Southampton (Southampton, NY), Seton Hall University (South Orange, NJ), Bank of America Headquarters (Charlotte, NC) Mass MoCA (North Adams, MA), Cape Cod Museum of Art (Dennis, MA) and Jyvaskyla Art Museum (Jyvaskyla, Finland) Fredette holds a BFA in sculpture from the Herron School of Art / Indiana University. Cynthia-Reeves in New York represents her work.

John Messinger

November 6 - 28, 2015

John Messinger combines elements of photography and tapestry to create large-scale, 3-dimension mixed media artworks. His body of work consists of thousands of individual 3.25” x 4.25” instant photographs assembled together to create photographic tapestries that examine the proliferation and ubiquity of the photograph in the digital age.

Inspired by the notions of singularity and time, Messinger combines hundreds of varying images and transforms them into a single experience. His work fuses indexical and abstract imagery to question the notion of photography, photographer, and subject. 

You Call That Art!: an exhibition of editorial cartoons by Charlie Daniel

December 4 - January 29, 2016

The exhibition featured a large selection of “Rosy’s Diner” cartoons as well as a variety of subjects and themes from the past two decades. Charlie Daniel came to Knoxville in 1958 as the editorial cartoonist for The Knoxville Journal. He moved to the Knoxville News Sentinel in January 1992 and has been the editorial cartoonist here ever since.


Death Rock City: Dannielle Tegeder

January 24 - February 28, 2014

Featuring new and recent work, Death Rock City examines how New York artist Dannielle Tegeder challenges the two-dimensional boundaries of traditional